North Georgia Fishing Report: Oct. 24, 2014

Info Provided by: Jeff Durniak, GA DNR North Georgia Region Fisheries Supervisor and North Georgia Region Fisheries staff

This is a great time of year to go hunting for big fall brown trout.

Fisheries biologist Patrick O'Rouke with a nice 8-plus-pound brown trout collected while sampling the Chattahoochee River near Buford Dam on Monday.
Fisheries biologist Patrick O’Rouke with a nice 8-plus-pound brown trout collected while sampling the Chattahoochee River near Buford Dam on Monday.

With cooler water temperatures and the spawning urge beginning to stir in them, they’re on the move.  Serious stalkers should throw some baits, flies, or lures that have enough perceived calories to make it worth their while to come over and take a swipe.  Leave the midge patterns at home.   Remember that a good hunter searches carefully for his/her quarry before beginning their stalk.   Lesson- – scout (observe) and hunt (stalk) before you fish.

Also remember that this is the last hurrah for Georgia’s seasonal trout streams, which close on Nov. 1.  Take your “last shot” at those colorful headwater specks and rainbows while you can.  If the water’s a bit cold before lunch and the dry fly action is slow, drop a prince nymph or pheasant tail soft hackle two feet off the back of that dry.  Good luck as you try to beat the leaf fall and fit a few more casting trips in before hitting the sidelines for a week or so.  Stalk closer, cast shorter,  reduce the number of knots on your line (drop the dropper flies, limit the split shot), and retrieve with the stream flow, rather than against it,  to catch fewer leaves and more fish.   Once the majority of leaf fall has passed, our year-round north Georgia streams will again be easy to fish.  Don’t forget the camera to “shoot” both the trout and the scenery of north Georgia as both of these spectacles reach their peak of color in the next two weeks.

Call for Trout Volunteers – Nov. 1

“Rock Creek Workday

Sorry for the short notice but I just received word that we have a stream improvement workday on Saturday November 1.  We will be working in stream clearing some old structures and installing new structures as well.

Directions are below and are also available on the Coosa Valley TU website, coosavalley.tu.org.  Work will start at 9:00 am.

If you are available to help or have questions please email Jeff Walters, mjw1990@yahoo.com.  Once we know who is helping we can set up carpools to the worksite.

From Marietta- Take I 75 N to Hwy 411 North to Fairmount continue on 411 north.  Travel about 19 miles to stoplight at Ramhurst/Smyrna Rd turn right. Go about 250 yards turn right then and immediate left on to Old Federal Road.  Go 2.3 miles turn right on Peeples Lake Road. This is a long dirt road , after going about 5 miles look for signs directing you to the work site.

From Canton-Take I575/Hwy 515 north to GA Hwy 136 West to Hwy 411 North.  Go approx 8 miles  to stoplight at Ramhurst/Smyrna Rd turn right. Go about 250 yards turn right then and immediate left on to Old Federal Road.  Go 2.3 miles turn right on Peeples Lake Road. This is a long dirt road , after going about 5 miles look for signs directing you to the work site.

Thanks in advance for your help!”

Additional Links:

My First Brown Trout”

Hooch TailwaterReport 1, Report 2

Another Hefty Hooch Brown – Fisheries staff picked up this nice 8 3/4 pound brown trout while electrofishing in the Chattahoochee River near Buford Dam on Monday. After being measured and weighed, she was released to hopefully be caught again by a lucky Georgia angler. Fall is a great time to target large brown trout in the ‘Hooch with lures or flies imitating small trout or other baitfish.

George Daniel Here – Saturday

Roswell BanquetOct. 28

Trouting Open House – Nov. 1

Lanier Bass

Lanier Stripers Overdue

Allatoona Reports

Great Fall DestinationTry Tugalo Lake for a mixed bag, including walleye:

World Record Holder in Our MidstCongrats to Kevin!

Safety First! – Watch your step when speck fishing on steep mountain streams.  You want to hike back to the car rather than have our rangers copter you out!  Some of you may recognize the names of your northeast Georgia conservation rangers involved  in this rescue effort.

Be safe and have fun during a beautiful fall “hunting” season. With a little luck to complement your skills, maybe you’ll bag your own trophy brown trout, striper, or walleye.

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